Match Rates

LiveRamp enables accurate matching of records across our network of 500+ partners, empowering marketers to reach desired audiences at greater scale across channels and platforms.

Match rates are one method to measure the addressability and reach of an audience on a given destination platform.

Match rates are provided upon request, and as part of Match Reports that can be generated for each of your files.

How LiveRamp Calculates Match Rates

A match rate is calculated as the percentage of total unique, identifiable records that we can match to one or more online devices (such as mobile device IDs or cookies) at a specified destination.

match rate diagram.jpg

Note

We exclude any records that are not being delivered to any destination (because they are not assigned to a field or segment that is being distributed).

Note

How many devices does LiveRamp usually match to each record? On average we can deterministically match 2.5 devices to each input record in a file. Unfortunately, we're not able to report this number on a per record basis.

Why Match Rates Vary

Since match rates are based on input file and the destination platform, they can vary based on a number of factors, including (but not limited to):

  • Input identifier type: Name and postal, email, phone, cookie, mobile device ID, etc.

  • Quality of data: The accuracy and completeness of input records.

  • Matching methodology: Deterministic or probabilistic matching.

  • Precision level:Individual, household, or neighborhood (using a household or neighborhood precision level will result in higher match rates).

  • ID persistency: IDs such as cookies are not persistent over time  and lead to match expiration. Also, LiveRamp's lookback window for cookies is 90 days but many destination platforms' lookback windows are shorter, sometimes as short as 30 days, which can cause a discrepancy between the two match rates (check the destination platform for their specific lookback window).

Tips to Improve Your Match Rate

If you're looking to improve your match rates, consider the following options:

  • Provide as many identifier fields as possible in your input file (i.e., email address, phone number, and name & postal address fields). Using plaintext emails (instead of hashed emails) may also provide a boost in match rates.

  • Adopt an enhanced addressability program using email and authenticated site traffic linkages and/or offline data to maximize reach on RampID-enabled audiences.

  • For brands: Adopt Addressability Extension to maximize the effectiveness of your owned data to increase match rates and improve measurement. See "Addressability Extension" for more information.Addressability Extension

  • For publishers: Adopt Addressability Extension and the Authenticated Traffic Solution (ATS) to deliver a higher find rate of audiences on your site in a privacy-first manner.Addressability Extension

  • Use household or neighborhood precision levels to increase reach. See "Precision Levels" for more information.

To explore any of the following options, contact your LiveRamp representative.

Typical Match Rates

Match rates vary based on factors, including (but not limited to) the identifiers you provide in your file, the match precision level you're using, and the level of online activity for users in your file.

With those caveats, here are a few ballpark match rate estimates for various types of files:

  • Files containing personal email addresses: 35–55%.

  • Files containing business email addresses: 20–35%.

  • Files containing name and postal addresses without email addresses: 25–35%.

Facebook Match Rates

Due to the nature of LiveRamp's integration with Facebook, match rates are calculated and displayed differently than they are for other destination platforms. See the sections below for more information.

Calculating Match Rates for Facebook Custom Audiences

To determine the match rate range for a Facebook custom audience created via LiveRamp, first divide the Facebook custom audience low range estimate (given within the Ads Manager UI) by the number of input records in the field or segment you distributed to Facebook (on the Audience Segments page in LiveRamp Connect). Then do the same with the Facebook high range estimate for that audience. This will give you a match rate range, from the lower estimated number to the higher estimated number.

When calculating match rates for Facebook, LiveRamp does not use the number of records (rows) sent to Facebook in the calculation; instead, the number of input records from the original field or segment (also known as “LiveRamp Input Records”) is used.

LiveRamp does not use the number of records (rows) sent to Facebook because oftentimes multiple rows of information are sent to Facebook (if using the Direct Integration) or multiple ExternIDs (if using the Managed or Data Marketplace integrations) per original input record. Using the number of rows (rather than LiveRamp input records) would cause Facebook’s match rate to be misleading and wouldn’t accurately reflect the original 'size' of the field or segment.

You can view the input records stat on the Audience Segments page in LiveRamp Connect, but unfortunately this information is not directly visible in Facebook or within the Ads Manager UI.

Why Facebook Match Rates Might be Lower

It's not abnormal to see lower than expected match rates when delivering data to Facebook, due to the way the LiveRamp integration with Facebook works. We will often distribute more than one row of data per “person” in the original file, and then Facebook will match those multiple rows back to one Facebook user, as expected, but because of how the logic for Facebook’s “low match rate” flag is designed (it will appear if Facebook matches less than 30% of the API calls sent to an audience), the Facebook UI will show a “low match rate” flag even though the match rate is not actually low.

For example, we may distribute 5 rows of identifiers for a single “person” from the original file, and then Facebook will match these 5 rows back to a single Facebook user, but their matching logic erroneously calculates a 20% match rate (1 user/5 rows), even though the actual match rate was 100% (1 user/1 input record).

If you calculate the actual match rate by taking the audience size from Facebook and dividing that by input records from within LiveRamp, you will typically find a ‘normal’ match rate.”

Why Facebook Match Rates Might be Higher

There are several factors that can contribute to a higher than expected match rate at Facebook, in addition to some of the typical reasons match rates are sometimes higher at destination platforms (such as the precision level used).

Due to the nature of our Facebook integration, LiveRamp does not know which set of PII a person has shared with Facebook. Therefore, LiveRamp may send the same person to Facebook multiple times with different combinations of PII which may match to different Facebook users. This optimizes for reach, ensuring we match the target user on Facebook.

Due to the nature of our integration with Facebook, LiveRamp is unable to receive a match rate from Facebook and therefore, Facebook match rates fall outside of how LiveRamp typically defines match rates. The Facebook match rate is Facebook ID (equates to Facebook account, not user) over LiveRamp input records. This can sometimes cause anomalies in match rates when a user views their match rate within Facebook as Facebook is unable to receive LiveRamp input record counts.

CID Data does not expire at Facebook: When an audience is first uploaded to LiveRamp, we send it over to Facebook. If you subsequently fully refresh the audience, we send over any new users you have added to the audience, However, older users no longer in the audience do not expire and will remain in the audience count on the Facebook side. This can cause an increase in match rates.

Including multiple identifiers for each person: Having multiple PII in a record can increase match rates significantly as it increases the number of RampIDs we match for each record, effectively increasing the audience size of CIDs we send to Facebook.

Multiple Facebook IDs: Some users have multiple Facebook accounts for either fun or work. In cases such as this, it becomes likely that Facebook will match one of the user accounts when we send some hashed-PII and the other user account when we send a different combination of hashed-PII. When the hashed PII we send matches to multiple Facebook users, it will lead to a match rate that is over 100%.

Why the “Low Match Rate Flag” Might Appear in Facebook

The “low match rate” flag will appear if Facebook matches less than 30% of the rows sent to an audience in Facebook. This often occurs due to how we distribute data to Facebook.

Before we distribute the data to Facebook, we break out each individual identifier in a record into a separate row before matching each row, first to a and then to the corresponding Facebook CIDs. For example, for one input row that contains name and postal, phone 1, phone 2, email 1, and email 2, we would create five rows, one for each individual identifier. Because of this, we will often distribute more than one row of data per “person” in the original file.

Facebook matches CIDs to Facebook users using a mapping they hold of CIDs<>Facebook users. This mapping is refreshed once a quarter, when we send Facebook a new mapping of CID<>hashed PII, which they use to create the mapping of CID<>Facebook user on their end.

If Facebook then matches those multiple rows we sent back to one Facebook user, because of how the logic for that “low match rate” flag is designed, the Facebook UI will show an artificial “low match rate” flag even though the match rate is not actually low.

In this example, if Facebook matches those five rows back to one Facebook user, Facebook calculates this as a 20% match rate, even though the true match rate was 100% (one input record to one Facebook user).

If you calculate the actual match rate by taking the audience size from Facebook and dividing that by the number of input records from within LiveRamp, you will typically find a ‘normal’ match rate.